Merk argiewe: Australies

Australian senator calls Queen a coloniser and gives Black power salute in parliament

Australian senator calls Queen a coloniser and gives Black power salute in parliament
‘I sovereign, Lidia Thorpe, do solemnly and sincerely swear that I will be faithful and I bear true allegiance to the colonising her majesty Queen Elizabeth II’

Indigenous senator Lidia Thorpe described BrittanjeSe Elizabeth II as a “colonising” queen and raised her fist in a Black power salute while taking the oath in Australië’s parliament.

Ms Thorpe, a Greens party senator for Victoria, also raised her fist while walking up to the centre of the parliament for the oath on Monday morning.

The senator looked visibly reluctant as she swore to serve the 96-year-old British monarch, who remains Australia’s head of state.

“I sovereign, Lidia Thorpe, do solemnly and sincerely swear that I will be faithful and I bear true allegiance to the colonising her majesty Queen Elizabeth II," sy het gese.

Ms Thorpe added the word “colonising”, which is not in the formal oath.

She was then asked by Labor senate president Sue Lines to repeat the oath as printed on the card, as other senators voiced their criticism.

<p>Lidia Thorpe also raised her fist while walking up to the centre of the parliament for the oath </bl>

Lidia Thorpe also raised her fist while walking up to the centre of the parliament for the oath

“You are required to recite the oath as printed on the card,” Ms Lines told the Greens senator. “Please recite the oath.”

She recited the lines correctly at the second attempt but went on Twitter to declare “sovereignty never ceded” as she shared a photo of her raising her fist.

Ms Thorpe is a vocal indigenous rights campaigner and has raised questions about the country’s constitution.

Section 42 van die Australies constitution states that “every senator and every member of the House of Representatives shall before taking his seat make and subscribe” to the oath of allegiance.

The provision can be changed only with a referendum.

Australia gained independence from British rule in 1901 but never became a fully-fledged republic like several other colonies. Australia was a British colony for more than 100 jare, a period when thousands of Aboriginal Australians were killed and displaced.

“I do support a republic,” prime minister Anthony Albanese told CNN op Sondag. But he said a referendum on that issue would have to wait until after another one that promises to give Aboriginal Australians an institutional role in policymaking.

“Our priority this term is the recognition of First Nations people in our constitution," hy het gesê.

Ms Thorpe was attacked by parliamentary colleagues for her modified oath. One of them could be heard yelling: “You’re not a senator if you don’t do it properly.”

During her first swearing-in in 2020, Ms Thorpe said her community was not excited about that moment because she would be “swearing allegiance to the coloniser”.

Verlede maand, she dubbed Australia a “colonial project” and said the national flag did not represent her.

“It represents the colonisation of these lands, and it has no permission to be here. There’s been no consent, there’s been no treaty, so that flag does not represent me,” she told Channel 10’s The Project.